A review of a chapter in susan sontags book on photography

Simply stated, photography is taking pictures. Having take hundreds of photographs in Southeast Asia, crying with camera on the evils of hunger and poverty, I agree. Photographs really are experience captured, andthe camera is the ideal arm of consciousness in its acquisitive mood.

In another version of its utility, the camera record justifies.

Review of Susan Sontag’s Regarding the Pain of Others Paper

I hope she does not mean the book - or booklet - she has written. For one thing, there are a great many more images around, claiming our attention. But despite the presumption of veracity that gives all photographs authority, interest, seductiveness, the work that photographers do is no generic exception to the usually shady commerce between art and truth.

Like painting, yet essentially different, photography is now considered a high art, capable of illuminating the human experience. But to know an experience by seeing it photographed is to know it as distanced, second-hand, fragmentary.

Photographs really are experience captured, andthe camera is the ideal arm of consciousness in its acquisitive mood. The entire section is 1, words. There is an aggression implicit in every use of the camera.

Before this type of image was so widely available, it was thought that viewing the suffering of another helped bring the pain of reality closer and would more effectively link the viewer to the pain and thus spur him to action.

Inthe Russian victors hoisting the Red Flag over the Reichstag in Berlin took direction from a Soviet war photographer who dreamt up this iconic moment. Having been drip-fed fantasies and outright lies, how can we properly respond to the remote, exotic miseries on which photographic journalists report?

There are some images, Sontag ascertains, that continue to shock as they are too horrific to be viewed often. The monograph concludes with an examination of the differences of opinions about photography between American and Chinese culture and politics.

The allegory shows that the prisoners in the cave only see an image of reality which is the shadow, but never the real objects behind them. The victims of famine and massacre are always, as Neville Chamberlain dismissively said of the Poles, people we do not know; when genocide recurred during the Bosnian war, we were reminded that the Balkans should not be considered part of Europe.

But more than that, it involves the eye and the soul of the photographer using a mechanical tool to record both a physical reality and an inner reality.Susan Sontag's monograph On Photography is composed of six named chapters, or essays, which form a weakly related progression from conceptualization through history and implementation, to the then-current understanding of photography as a process and an art form.

Susan Sontag, In Plato’s Cave from the book: On Photography. Humankind lingers unregenerately in Plato's Cave, still reveling, its age-old habit, in mere images of the truth.

But being educated by photographs is not like being educated by older, more artisanal images. For one thing, there are a great.

What the eye can't see...

Chapter nine takes up the literal space in which photographs are viewed, that is whether they are looked at in a personal photo album as opposed to a published book, or hanging on a wall in a museum rather than on the wall of a boutique.

Susan Sontag's monograph On Photography is composed of six named chapters, or essays, which form a weakly related progression from conceptualization through history and implementation, to the then-current understanding of photography as a process and an art form.

Regarding the Pain of Others by Susan Sontag Hamish Hamilton £, pp This is Susan Sontag's second book on photography and, like the first, published init contains no photographs. Susan Sontag’s text, On Photography, brought photographic theory into the university classroom with its staunch defence of the medium as art and inspired a new wave of Marxist Criticism in the field.

Sontag explains the way in which we are.

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A review of a chapter in susan sontags book on photography
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